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Haddenham Surgery

DR A RAHMAN

DR C ABRAHAM
DR K BRINKHURST
DR L GERZA
DR N HORN
DR A PEAKE

 

 

VACCINATIONS

 

 

 

A checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK and the ages at which they should ideally be given, can be found at NHS Choices.

 

 

If you're not sure whether you or your child have had all your routine vaccinations, ask your GP or practice nurse. It may be possible to catch up later in life.

 

 

 

CLICK HERE for more information on the current vaccination schedule. 

 

PERTUSSIS (WHOOPING COUGH) VACCINATION FOR PREGNANT WOMEN

 

   

 From April 2016 the Pertussis (Whooping Cough) vaccination is being offered earlier to women from around the 20 week scan to 38 weeks.  It should be given in every pregnancy.  Vaccination can also be given up to the onset of labour.  Please contact the Practice Nurse for further information.

 

 

CLICK HERE for Public Health England Patient Information 

 

 


 

 PROTECTION FROM MENINGITIS AND SEPTICIAEMIA

 

 

This vaccine protects against meningitis (inflammation of the brain) and septicaemia (blood poisoning) caused by meningococcal groups A, C, W and Y and replaces the previously used single Men C vaccination.

 

It is very important that you take up the vaccine.  It is being offered in response to a growing increase in cases of the highly aggressive strain of meningococcal disease group W.  This disease can cause meningitis and septicemia that can kill in hours and those who recover may be left severely disabled.  The vaccine also protects against three other meningococcal groups too – A, C and Y.

 

 

   

Please make an appointment to see the Practice Nurse for your Meningitis ACWY vaccination if:-

 

  • You are 19 - 25 years old and are going to University for the first time.  You are more at risk of meningitis and septicaemia in the first few weeks at university when you are mixing with lots of new people, some of whom may unknowingly carry the meningococcal bacteria, which is usually spread through prolonged close contact.
  • You missed the booster vaccinations given in school at around 14 years of age (Year 13).
  • You are at increased risk of invasive meningococcal infection because of asplenia, splenic dysfunction or complement disorders (including those on, or to commence, complement inhibitor treatment eg eculizumab.

  

CLICK HERE for more information about Meningitis ACWY

 


 

SHINGLES

 

 

Shingles is a common skin disease and can be very painful.  It starts with a burning sensation in the skin, followed by a rash of very painful blisters that can then burst and turn into sores before healing.

 

There is a vaccine available on the NHS to certain people in their 70s.

 

Talk to one of the Nurses who will be able to let you know if you are eligible.

 

The shingles vaccine is given as a single injection into the upper arm. The vaccine is expected to reduce your risk of getting shingles, but if you do get the disease, your symptoms may be milder and the illness shorter.

 

For more information about Shingles visit NHS Choices.

 

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